Quilts and Bears Warm Area Children

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More than 125 teddy bears dressed and wrapped in coordinating quilts greeted Lieutenant Laurie Ferraez, commanding officer, Annapolis Salvation Army, when she attended the December meeting of the Annapolis Quilt Guild. For more than 25 years, creative and generous quilters of the Guild have been dressing teddy bears and making coordinated quilts for families served by the Annapolis Salvation Army. Shown (l-r) are: Lt. Laurie Ferraez; Trish Hankey, president, Annapolis Quilt Guild; Jackie Barnes and Priscilla O’Dell, co-chairs of the Guild’s events committee.

Each year, Annapolis Quilt Guild quilters answer the Salvation Army’s call for teddy bears and quilts for the children whose families they serve throughout the year. The effort begins in September when the Annapolis Salvation Army provides teddy bears to the Guild which distributes them to members. Willing quilters get down to the delightful work of choosing the colors and design of the quilts they will make. For the bear that will accompany the quilt, they can craft or purchase a coordinating outfit.

“The Annapolis Quilt Guild has had a relationship with the Annapolis Salvation Army for more than 25 years,” says Trish Hankey, Guild president. “Making the quilts and dressing the bears is an important community project among our members who want to share the beauty and warmth of quilts and bears with children in need. Our members are dedicated quilters who are also committed to helping our community.”

“This year we donated more than 125 bears wrapped in quilts which the Salvation Army then distributed during the holidays,” notes Jackie Barnes, co-chair of the Guild’s events committee. “It is truly an outpouring of care at a time when children in need want to feel loved.”

Quilts range in size from bear-sized to lap-size quilts that are about 40” by 60” and some quilters make twin-size quilts for the older children. Guild members design the quilts for boys and girls and create a colorful assortment of sports teams, unicorns, fairy princesses, firemen and sail boats.

“I can assure you that your work brings a smile to the faces of parents who are looking to the Salvation Army for assistance for their children at Christmas,” Lt. Laurie Ferraez, commanding officer of the Annapolis Salvation Army Corps, told Guild members at the December meeting. “My mom is a quilter so I know first-hand the hard work you put into making these quilts and bear outfits.”

“For many of the children who receive your quilts and bears, your quilt is their first experience with something not only made for them, but also made by hand. This is a meaningful gift because the quilt is theirs, they can hold it and the quilt keeps them warm,” Lt. Ferraez concluded. “We continue to be extremely grateful to the generous quilters of the Annapolis Quilt Guild.”

The Annapolis Quilt Guild was established in 1981 and holds monthly meetings in Annapolis at St. Philip’s Episcopal ChurchThe 300 members of the Guild range from novice quilters to accomplished artists. They inspire and teach each other and contribute to the community. The Salvation Army Corps, founded in England in 1865, serves in Annapolis more than 500 families and their more than 1,040 children during the Christmas season.

 

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